ON THE OCCASION OF SAMOA NATIONAL DAY

 

Mike Pompeo
Secretary of State
Washington, DC

Please accept our best wishes as you and the people of Samoa celebrate Independence Day.

Since 1971, the United States and the Independent State of Samoa have been close and enduring partners in the Pacific. Our two countries are joined by our shared belief in democracy and freedom. Together, we have partnered to further these foundational principles across the region. This work continues as we work together in the Indo-Pacific to promote democracy, expand economic opportunity and safeguard natural resources.

May today remind you of the freedoms we have secured, the freedom we enjoy today, and the freedom we are striving to secure for the generations to come. Happy Independence Day

Independence Days

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Photo: Thomas Hawk

By Peg Ryan
Mile High Pilates and Yoga

Custer, SD – Recently I gave a birthday card to a friend which featured an elderly woman wearing stereotypical motorcycle gear including black leather jacket and hat complete with metal studs.  The message on the cover was something like “We’re young enough to be rebels” followed by the punch line inside: “but old enough not to give a crap!”  We had a good chuckle over this sentiment, but it got me to thinking.  How many of us really get to a point where we stop caring what other people think? Of course, there are some of us who have never cared.  Personally I admire those free spirits.  But most of us have public perception so deeply ingrained in our psyches that it is difficult to avoid dancing through our lives to someone else’s tune.  Even if we manage to avoid the trap of wondering “how will this look to others?”, we often create arbitrary standards for ourselves by which we gauge our actions or appearance.  We berate ourselves when we fall short and feel pleased when we meet the measurement only to be disappointed when we find it difficult to sustain.  We’re all guilty of this at one time or another, myself very much included.

Another friend recently described an incident in which she found herself running through a crowd trying to catch up with a group she was with that had moved on without her.  “I was so embarrassed!” she said as she recounted the story. “What if I had tripped and stumbled or fallen?”  Thankfully, she didn’t.  And she did manage to reunite with her group.  But I could not help but wonder why this should be embarrassing.  The fact that she could run at all was, to me, something to celebrate rather than something to hide.  And even if she had slipped, someone in the crowd would certainly have helped her.  In my opinion, the fear of “looking silly” limited her freedom.  Instead of enjoying that run, she probably just wanted to get it over with hoping that no one would notice.  Our society places a high value on the concept of freedom and yet as individuals we consistently limit our own.

Sometimes the fear of being judged by others can, unfortunately, be justified.  It never ceases to amaze me how easily people are willing to condemn perfect strangers based on nothing more than third party hearsay.  Judgments can be pronounced without any personal knowledge of the individual being judged or the circumstances that person finds themselves in.  Our modern society seems to be particularly segmented these days with people forming like-minded groups and listening only to those that agree with them.  Regrettably, this is not a new phenomenon.  It has been going on for as long as humans have engaged in social structures.  In fact, it may well be the reason we all have built-in judgment meters. Centuries of rules and standards of behavior have been established to mark the differences among tribes. These standards have given people observable methods for determining who is like me (safe) and who is different from me (dangerous). It has been programmed into our DNA to abide by the rules others have laid out.

But I digress. This article is not about the rules societies need to survive and thrive. Instead I’m referring here to those quirky internal rules we think we need to follow that are more related to perception than they are to survival. In fact, rather than contributing to our well-being, these rules can instead be a source of resentment and self-destruction. Still there is an upside.  Since we created these rules, we have the power to change them.

Here is something to keep in mind when you’re worrying about how others will view you:  most people are so focussed on themselves that they won’t even notice what you’re doing.  Which brings me back to my favorite topic:  exercise. These ideas, though, can apply to anything done in groups or in public.  In general, whatever it is that concerns you, the person next to you is probably worrying about the same thing. Or maybe something completely different, but whatever they are thinking it is probably not about you. The stress you create for yourself by stewing about what you look like is keeping you from paying attention to the movement itself, how it feels and the positive benefits it is providing for you.  It also keeps you from experiencing the freedom of customizing the rules and moving in a way that is uniquely your own.

In the days when I was running I knew that my biomechanics and body type would probably never allow me to become a really fast runner.  Once when I asked a shoe salesman if he could recommend a style suitable for my foot type and running style he said, “There really isn’t anything.  Most people with those characteristics find it too painful to run.” As discouraging as that sounded, it did not keep me from running.  I ran for the love of running, not because I ever expected to be any good at it.  I learned to do the best I could with what I had to work with regardless of how it looked.  When injury and other circumstances meant that I could no longer sustain running, I changed my goals and found other ways to continue moving that have been just as satisfying.  Goals are an important motivating force, but all goals need to be flexible.  Everything is always changing.  Goals and the rules we establish to get to them should always be adaptable to changing circumstances.

One more thing to remember – we are all individuals with our own gifts, characteristics and idiosyncrasies but ultimately we are also interconnected.  Despite our fear of “the other”, we all have more in common than we might recognize. Everyone wants to survive; everyone wants to be loved.  We all need the basic elements of survival – food, shelter, etc. – and we all want to provide for ourselves, our families and loved ones.  Similarly everyone has experienced their own trials, mistakes, regrets or other foibles.  No one is exempt, no matter how perfect they appear or how good their lives look to us from the outside.  So do your own thing and stop worrying. If you stumble, have some compassion for yourself. Pick yourself up and keep moving. The person next to you has had their own stumbles and knows what it feels like.

HUMAN RIGHTS DAY

John Kerry
Secretary of State
Washington, DC
December 10, 2016

The United Nations General Assembly adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights 68 years ago today to recognize and elevate the inherent dignity and inalienable rights of all individuals.

On this International Human Rights Day, we recommit ourselves to upholding universal respect for the fundamental freedoms of all humankind.

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights holds the promise of hope for the civilians who are caught in the crossfire of conflict, the citizens who fight against repressive governments, the families that are driven out of their homes and displaced by conflict, and the workers who are exploited for the profit of others. We stand in solidarity with those working to secure better and brighter futures, and commit to safeguarding their inalienable human rights in the pursuit of freedom, justice, and peace.

Today and every day, the United States will continue to urge all nations to observe the principles of liberty, democracy, free expression, and equal protection under the law without distinction based on race, creed, sexual orientation, political opinion, or faith. As we celebrate the progress we’ve made toward a more just world, we reaffirm our unwavering devotion to a universal value—preserving and protecting the equal and inalienable human rights of all people.

On The Occasion of: Naturalization Ceremony at Mount Rushmore National Memorial

Oath of Allegiance
I solemnly swear that I will support and and defend the Constitution
and laws of America against all enemies, foreign and domestic;

That I will give up and surrender any alliance to any king, queen or
prince, or to any state or country, which I have
held up until this day;

That as a citizen of the United States, I will, when lawfully
directed, bear arms or perform noncombatant service in the
Armed Forces of the United States, or I will, when
directed, perform non-military service on behalf of the
United States

That I take these obligations freely, without any purpose of
evasion, and declare today, that I am a citizen
of the United States of  America

And so said 244 immigrants from 46 countries at the Naturalization Ceremony at Mount Rushmore National Memorial Thursday morning.

 

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Lori Scialabba, Deputy Director U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services. Photo: Herb Ryan/Custer Free Press

 

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Jose Irahta and Jose Bermudec both from San Salvador wait for the Naturalization Ceremony at Mount Rushmore National Monument to begin. Photo:Herb Ryan/Custer Free Press

 

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Immigrants take the Oath of Allegiance at the Naturalization Ceremony at Mount Rushmore National Monument. Photo:Herb Ryan/Custer Free Press

 

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Immigrants take the Oath of Allegiance at the Naturalization Ceremony at Mount Rushmore National Monument. Photo:Herb Ryan/Custer Free Press

 

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The Honorable Jeffery L. Viken. Chief Judge, U.S. District Court congratulates a new U.S. Citizen following the Oath of Allegiance at the Naturalization Ceremony at Mount Rushmore National Monument. Photo:Herb Ryan/Custer Free Press

 

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The Honorable Daneta Wollman Magistrate Judge U.S. District Court congratulates a new U.S. Citizen following the Oath of Allegiance at the Naturalization Ceremony at Mount Rushmore National Monument. Photo:Herb Ryan/Custer Free Press

 

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Cheryl A. Schreier, Superintendent, Mount Rushmore National Memorial congratulates a new U.S. Citizen following the Oath of Allegiance at the Naturalization Ceremony at Mount Rushmore National Monument. Photo:Herb Ryan/Custer Free Press

 

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A new U.S. Citizen waits in line for the presentation of her citizens certificate following the Oath of Allegiance at the Naturalization Ceremony at Mount Rushmore National Monument. Photo:Herb Ryan/Custer Free Press

 

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New Citizens register to Vote following the Naturalization Ceremony at Mount Rushmore National Monument. Photo:Herb Ryan/Custer Free Press