Aces and Eights Classic Country Music LIVE at The Journey Museum and Learning Center

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RAPID CITY, SD – If you are looking for artists that will bring the nostalgia of real country music to the stage, you won’t need to look any further than Aces & Eights Classic Country Music! The Journey Museum & Learning Center is proud to announce that the classic country duo will be LIVE in concert at The Journey on Saturday, December 3,2016.

Doors for Aces & Eights Classic Country Music will open at 5 p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 3 with a social hour and cash bar and the performance will begin at 6 p.m. Aces & Eights is a duo formed by Harland Allen & Kim Bachman and are committed to bringing back the roots of country music. Listeners find themselves on a journey back to a simpler time when country music was authentic; no fluff added. This very tradition reveals itself in the masterful guitar licks, old time banjo, and sweet mandolin melodies in correlation with the strong leads and beautiful harmonies of Aces & Eights.

Aces & Eights Classic Country Music received 2016 CD of the Year from two organizations; National Traditional Country Music Association and the South Dakota Country Music Hall of Fame.

Harland Allen was born in Missoula, Montana and raised in Lakewood, Colorado. He grew up listening to Hank Williams, Burl Ives, Marty Robbins and several other Folk and Country music artists from the 1950’s and 1960’s. He started his first garage band in Junior High School and spent his teenage years playing Rock and Roll. Returning to his Country and Folk roots he played as a soloist at local night clubs and lounges. His first gig for money was in 1977 at The Ground Round Restaurant and Lounge in Lakewood, CO. He continued to perform at local clubs and lounges playing acoustic guitar and singing songs by people like Cat Stevens, James Taylor, The Eagles and a variety of Country and Folk music. Over the years Harland has performed as a soloist and in a number of duos, trios, four and five piece bands. He now lives in Sturgis, SD with his wife and family.

Kimberly Bachman grew up in Iowa on a farm. She bought her first guitar with her money from working in the fields all summer. Kim was surrounded by country music. Family tradition entailed Saturday night gatherings around the kitchen table when relatives would come over to visit and play music. She is firmly rooted in the country music of the 60’s and 70’s with a strong alto voice that carries one back to the day of the women who were the true legends of country music. Kim also plays the banjo and the mandolin, sings lead and harmony. Over the past ten years, she has filled in with a number of small bands until she found her true country niche with Aces & Eights. She lives in Belle Fourche, SD with her husband and family.

Admission for Aces & Eights Classic Country Music is $12 for adults, $10 for seniors, 1/2 off for members and FREE for students 5-17 with paid adult/senior admission.

The Journey Museum & Learning Center was established in 1997 and is conveniently located in downtown Rapid City at 222 New York St, 2 blocks east of the Rushmore Plaza Civic Center right across from the Club for Boys. Make sure to visit http://www.journeymuseum.org to find additional schedule information and be sure to ‘like’ us on Facebook!

Burning Permits in the Black Hills May Open Later This Month

Rapid City, S.D.- Forecasted winter conditions with snow may allow the South Dakota Department of Agriculture’s Wildland Fire Division to open up the burn permit season for the Black Hills Forest Fire Protection District starting the weekend of Nov. 19.

Wildland Fire deputy director Jim Strain says, “Depending on snow cover conditions, we may just open up the Northern Black Hills for the season, and wait for more favorable conditions before opening up the rest of the rest of the Black Hills for burn permits.”

Normally, the Black Hills Forest Fire Protection District is opened for permitted burns starting Nov. 1, however abnormally warm and dry conditions pushed that date back this year. Temporary burn permits for either slash pile or debris burning may be obtained at www.sd.gov/burnpermits  Burn permits obtained on-line are good through the March 31 expiration date.

Burning without a permit in the Black Hills Forest Fire Protection District is class II misdemeanor and could result in $125 fine.

Agriculture is a major contributor to South Dakota’s economy, generating $25.6 billion in annual economic activity and employing over 115,000 South Dakotans. The South Dakota Department of Agriculture’s mission is to promote, protect and preserve this industry for today and tomorrow. Visit us online at http://sdda.sd.gov or find us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

Rattlesnake Under His Hat – The Story of Earl Brockelsby

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RAPID CITY, SD – The Journey Museum and Learning Center is excited to announce the next event in its Learning Forum Series set for Sunday, Nov. 20 titled ‘Rattlesnake Under His Hat: The Story of Earl Brockelsby’. Sam Hurst will discuss the incredible life of the man responsible for the world-famous Reptile Gardens.

‘Rattlesnake Under His Hat: The Story of Earl Brockelsby’ will begin at 2 p.m. on Nov. 20 in The Journey’s Wells Fargo Theater. Sam Hurst, author of Rattlesnake Under His Hat: The Life and Times of Earl Brockelsby, will discuss the incredible life of the man responsible for the world-famous Reptile Gardens.

Sam Hurst was given access to the complete archives of Reptile Gardens for Rattlesnake Under His Hat, including the financial records and five decades of private correspondence between Earl Brockelsby, his family, employees and business associates. By making use of regional and state archives, Hurst sets Brockelsby’s life in the context of the end of the frontier and the emergence of the tourism economy in western South Dakota.

Hurst is an Emmy Award-winning journalist and documentarian. In 1992, as a producer for NBC News, he was awarded a Neiman Fellowship in Journalism at Harvard University, where he studied evolutionary biology. Following his retirement from NBC, Hurst and his family moved to the Black Hills where he owned and operated a buffalo ranch and continued to produce independent documentary movies, including The Coming Plague fro Turner Broadcasting, A Falconer’s Memoir and Paul Ehrlich and the Population Bomb for PBS, Good Meat, for Native American Public Television and Lakota Star Knowledge for The Journey Museum & Learning Center with a grant from NASA. Hurst has written extensively about food and agriculture policy and South Dakota culture and politics, and for several years was a Sunday columnist for the Rapid City Journal.

Admission for Learning Forums is $12 for adults, $10 for seniors, half-off for members, and FREE for students/ children with a paid adult/senior admission (includes museum).

The Journey Museum & Learning Center was established in 1997 and is conveniently located in downtown Rapid City at 222 New York St, 2 blocks east of the Rushmore Plaza Civic Center right across from the Club for Boys. Make sure to visit http://www.journeymuseum.org to find additional schedule information and be sure to ‘like’ us on Facebook!

 

 

Silver Mountain Prescribed Fire Planned West of Rapid City, SD

 

Rapid City, SD, November 14, 2016 – The Mystic Ranger District on the Black Hills National Forest is planning to ignite 221 acres on the Silver Mountain project Tuesday, November 15 & Wednesday, November 16, depending on weather. Smoke will be visible for several miles and could impact Highway 16, Hill City, Rapid City and other surrounding areas. Crews have been preparing to implement the project to meet management objectives for several years.

The Silver Mountain project area is located approximately 10 miles west/southwest of Rapid City, SD between Highway 16 and Sheridan Lake Road, along Boulder Hill Road to the west.

The goal of the Silver Mountain Prescribed Fire is to maintain a mosaic of vegetation conditions created by the Battle Creek Fire of 2002. This project will lessen the severity and extent of future wildfires in the project area by breaking up the continuity of dead, downed fuels, ultimately reducing those fuel loads. Fire will also be utilized as a tool to thin pine regeneration and increase canopy base heights. Additionally, this burn will stimulate browse for big game species.

After many years of fire exclusion, an ecosystem, such as the Black Hills, needs periodic fire to remain healthy. Without it, trees are stressed by overcrowding, fire-dependent species disappear, and flammable fuels build up and become hazardous.

Forest visitors, including hunters, are asked to be aware of their surroundings and watch for prescribed burning operations in the months ahead. Areas where burning operations are taking place will be signed to notify visitors. The public is also encouraged to contact a nearby Forest Service office with questions.

As conditions permit, fire officials will continue to assess ignition of other prescribed burn units across the Black Hills National Forest.

For more information on Black Hills National Forest prescribed fire, visithttp://www.fs.usda.gov/detail/blackhills/landmanagement/resourcemanagement/?cid=STELPRDB5112694

Journey Museum learning Forum Series Isaiah Dorman – Myths and Mysteries

 

RAPID CITY, SD – The Journey Museum and Learning Center is excited to announce the next event in its Learning Forum Series set for Sunday, Nov. 13 titled ‘Isaiah Dorman: Myths & Mysteries’. Dr. Lilah Morton Pengra will discuss the misinformation, racism and mistranslation that obscured Isaiah Dorman’s life story for 40 years, the only African American killed at the Battle of Little Bighorn.

Other than the only African American killed at the Battle of Little Bighorn, who was Isaiah Dorman? Isaiah Dorman: Myths & Mysteries’ will begin at 2 p.m. on Nov. 13 in The Journey’s Wells Fargo Theater. Dr. Lilah Morton Pengra, author of the book Isaiah Dorman: Interpreting the Evidence, will tell how misinformation, racism and mistranslation has obscured Isaiah Dorman’s life story for 140 years. Her 15-year search required the skills of a detective and anthropologist to find and interpret linguistic and cultural clues. Her conclusion challenges how we “do history” in a multicultural world.

Dr. Lilah Morton Pengra, as an applied medical anthropologist, she consulted internationally with local communities on solving problems of cross-cultural communication between western medical service providers and indigenous people. She now applies her sill in identifying cultural differences that lead to misinterpretation and conflict to understanding historical documents from the multi-cultural American West, especially in the 19th century.

Her latest book, Isaiah Dorman: Interpreting the Evidence, premiered in July this year. Dorman was the only African American killed at the Battle of Little Bighorn. Historians of that event recorded little about his life prior to 1876; one writer even conjectured that he must have been a runaway slave. Pengra searched for 15 years and located bits of evidence at over 50 museums and archives in 19 states to reconstruct his biography.

Dr. Pengra’s previous publications include Your Values, My Values: Multicultural Services in Developmental Disabilities (Paul Brookes Publishing, 2000), Corporals, Cooks and Cowboys: African Americans in the Black Hills and Surrounding Areas (Lune House Publishing, 2006) and Sarah Campbell: The First White Woman in the Black Hills was African American (Lune House Publishing, 2009).

Dr. Pengra earned a B.A. in anthropology at Grinnell College, IA, M.A.s in African Studies and anthropology, a PhD in anthropology at University of Wisconsin-Madison, and did post-doc research in medical anthropology at South Dakota Tech, Rapid City.

Dr. Lilah Morton Pengra lives on Lame Johnny Creek near Buffalo Gap, SD, with her husband and 3 cats in an underground, passive solar home that they designed and built. Admission for Learning Forums is $12 for adults, $10 for seniors, $9 for students, and half-off for members (includes museum admission).

The Journey Museum & Learning Center was established in 1997 and is conveniently located in downtown Rapid City at 222 New York St, 2 blocks east of the Rushmore Plaza Civic Center right across from the Club for Boys.

Make sure to visit www. journeymuseum.org to find additional schedule information and be sure to ‘like’ us on Facebook!

Aspen Restoration & Forest Health Workshop

Aspen Restoration & Forest Health Workshop

RAPID CITY, S.D. – Many areas in the Black Hills and further west have seen quaking aspen stands slowly declining and disappearing over time. Aspen provide benefits including species diversity, wildlife habitat and aesthetic values. Increased species diversity contributes to overall forest resiliency.

A workshop promoting forest health and stewardship will be held on Nov. 5 at the Outdoor Campus West, 4130 Adventure Trail in Rapid City, from 10 a.m. to noon (MDT). This event will provide landowners and the general public an opportunity to learn about quaking aspen and successful management strategies to restore these unique stands across the landscape. Additional topics to be discussed include other forest management options to promote forest resiliency and the current status of the mountain pine beetle epidemic in the Black Hills.

Presenters at this workshop include Dr. John Ball, SDSU Extension forestry specialist and forest health specialist for the South Dakota Department of Agriculture (SDDA); Shelly Deisch, wildlife biologist for South Dakota Game, Fish and Parks; and Parks Brigman, forest stewardship coordinator for SDDA.

For more information, call Parks Brigman at 605.394.2395 or email john.brigman@state.sd.us.

Agriculture is a major contributor to South Dakota’s economy, generating $25.6 billion in annual economic activity and employing over 115,000 South Dakotans. The South Dakota Department of Agriculture’s mission is to promote, protect and preserve this industry for today and tomorrow. Visit us online at http://sdda.sd.gov or find us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

Why Not Home? – FREE Film Event

 

RAPID CITY, SD – The Journey Museum and Learning Center is collaborating with South Dakota Birth Matters to screen the film ‘Why Not Home?’ on Nov. 4, discussing maternity care in the United States and the choices that women and their families are given.

Come join us in support of mothers, babies, and families! The ‘Why Not Home?’ FREE film event will begin at 6:30 p.m. at The Journey Museum & Learning Center. Doors will open at 6:30 p.m. and guests will have an opportunity to visit the various booth sponsors of this event. At 7 p.m., there will be a short introduction and then the film will begin. Discussion will follow the film at 8:30 p.m. and at 9 p.m., door prizes will be drawn.

There is still sponsor space available for this event. By becoming a sponsor, you will be helping families throughout South Dakota have access to improved maternity care and you will be featured in the South Dakota Birth Matters Resource Guide. A $500+ sponsorship includes a full page color ad, booth space, 10 reserved seats, and event acknowledgement; a $250 sponsorship includes a half-page color ad, booth space, and five reserved seats; a $150 sponsorship includes a quarter page ad and two reserved seats; a $100 sponsorship includes a half-page ad (business card size); a $75 sponsorship includes booth space; a $50 sponsorship includes a basic listing with Name/Business Name, Website, and Email (if applicable). All Sponsors will be mentioned on the South Dakota Birth Matters Facebook Event page: Why Not Home? – Free Film Event. Sponsors with booth space are asked to bring a gift basket/giveaway item (valued at $20+) for an event prize drawing. A table and two chairs are included in each booth space.

Beyond the personal stories, ‘Why Not Home?’ opens the discussion on maternity care in the U.S. and the choices women and families are given. Maternal mortality rates are rising in the U.S. at a time when they are falling in every other industrialized country. Why Not Home? challenges viewers to move beyond the polarization and judgment that has plagued this issue for decades, and instead, embrace a more integrated and collaborative model for the future.

This film is presented by South Dakota Birth Matters, an organization helping mothers and babies since 1992. Last year, the proposed Certified Professional Midwife (CPM) Licensure Bill stopped just short of the Governor’s office. It has been proposed that the Midwife Regulatory Board be self-funded a cost of $20,000.

Half of the funds have been raised, but $10,000 is still needed by January 1, 2017. With your help, South Dakota Birth Matters is confident they will be celebrating 25 years of helping mothers and babies in a BIG way this year!

For more information and details about this event or other items, please contact: Donna Ryan at (817) 789-1207 or donna@birthbootcamp.com.

The Journey Museum and Learning Center was established in 1997 and is conveniently located in downtown Rapid City at 222 New York St, 2 blocks east of the Rushmore Plaza Civic Center right across from the Club for Boys. Visit http://www.journeymuseum.org to find additional schedule information and be sure to ‘like’ us on Facebook!

SDPB’s Science Steve at The Journey Museum and Learning Center Sunday, Oct. 16, 2016

 

RAPID CITY, SD – The Journey Museum and Learning Center is excited to announce the next event in its Learning Forum Series titled, ‘SDPB’s  Science Steve’, slated for this Sunday, Oct. 16, featuring Steve Rokusek. Also as a special treat, Buddy from SDPB’s Dinosaur Train will be in attendance for kids to meet him! Children and students are FREE with a paid adult or senior admission.

‘SDPB’s Science Steve’ will begin at 2 p.m. in The Journey’s Wells Fargo Theater. SDPB’s Science Guy, Steven Rokusek, will use humor and 15 incredibly fascinating demonstrations to bring dry theorems and scientific laws to life.

Steven Rokusek is originally from Tyndall, SD. He graduated from Dakota State University with a degree in Biology and Computer Education. Steven has experience in teaching physics, physical science, anatomy, biology and earth science. He has received the Golden Apple Award for Teachers, the Who’s Who Among Teachers Award, the Archdiocese of Omaha Teacher of the Year Award and a Regional Emmy Nomination. He is also the recipient of the 2016 South Dakota School Age Care Alliance SACCY Award.

Steven develops resource materials for specific content areas and then provides in-service training (workshops) at schools and education conferences across the state for both educational staff and parents. He also creates weekly electronic education newsletter for teachers and parents.

Dinosaur Train embraces and celebrates the fascination that preschoolers have with both dinosaurs and trains, while encouraging basic scientific thinking skills as the audience learns about life science, natural history and paleontology. Young viewers can join Buddy and his adoptive Pteranodon family on a whimsical voyage through prehistoric jungles, swamps, volcanoes and oceans, as they unearth basic concepts in life science, natural history and paleontology.

Buddy will be available to take pictures prior to the forum and after the program is completed. The Buddy Dinosaur Train mascot is courtesy of Liv Hospitality and SDPB.

The Journey Museum & Learning Center was established in 1997 and is conveniently located in downtown Rapid City at 222 New York St, 2 blocks east of the Rushmore Plaza Civic Center right across from the Club for Boys. Make sure to visit http://www.journeymuseum.org to find additional schedule information and be sure to ‘like’ us on Facebook!

Nighttime Multi-Fire Department Training Exercise in Rapid City Area

All images: Herb Ryan/Custer Free Press
October 13, 2016

A nighttime high flow water training exercise involving Rockerville, Keystone, Whispering Pines, and Box Elder mutual aid fire departments was held Thursday evening in the north section of the Reptile Gardens parking lot on highway 16 in Rapid City.

 

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Keystone Fire Department dumps water into a holding tank. Photo:Herb Ryan/Custer Free Press

 

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Jeremy Walla, Whispering Pines Fire Department positions a water tanker next to the portable holding tanks.Photo: Herb Ryan/Custer Free Press

 

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Water being discharged into a portable holding tank. Photo:Herb Ryan/Custer Free Press

 

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Rockerville Fire Department engine 2 showing charged lines and holding tanks. Herb Ryan/Custer Free Press

 

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Rockerville Firefighter Chet Roberts keeps an eye on the water levels in a portable holding tank. Photo:Herb Ryan/Custer Free Press

 

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Rockerville Fire Department Chief takes a break and smiles for the camera. Photo:Herb Ryan/Custer Free Press

 

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A water tanker is backed into position to discharge its load into a holding tank. Photo:Herb Ryan/Custer Free Press

 

 

Rapid City Student Finds Undergraduate Research Opportunities at BHSU-RC

 

By Kimberly Talcott

SPEARFISH… Ashley Wasserburger knew she was interested in psychology when she began college at Black Hills State University-Rapid City. A few classes and a committed professor later, Ashley now has undergraduate research experience and a goal for a lifelong career.

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Black Hills State University-Rapid City student Ashley Wasserburger was selected to work with a faculty member on psychology research. Ashley is a sociology and psychology major from Rapid City.

After graduating from Rapid City Christian High School, Ashley took a year off and decided she wanted to stay close to home as she pursued her degree.

“I like the evening class options at BHSU-RC and they had the majors I wanted,” said Ashley, a psychology and sociology major.

Ashley says her interest in mental health and how the brain functions have been further sparked by her classes at BHSU-RC. When she took Abnormal Psychology with Dr. Emilia Flint, Dr. Flint invited Ashley to join her research team.

“The types of questions Ashley was asking in class showed that she was absorbing course material and figuring out a way to apply what she was reading to a scientific study of human behavior,” said Flint, associate professor of psychology. “Scientific inquiry, servant leadership, and humility are just some of the special skills that will make Ashley a great psychologist one day.”

What started as a simple class assignment for Ashley and her classmates has now expanded into a full research project. The hypothesis of her undergraduate research, says Ashley, is to determine if people are more likely to receive help from others based on their clothing choices.

“We know that physical characteristics like race and age can affect how people are judged and treated. Clothing choice impacts this too, but there’s not a lot of empirical data on this,” said Ashley. “You can’t always control what you look like, but you can control what you wear.”

Under Flint’s mentorship, Ashley is honing her skills in literature search and review, research design and implementation, and manuscript preparation processes as well as in the ethical conduct of research with human subjects.

Each of these skills will prove valuable as Ashley pursues an advanced degree leading to a promising career.

“I want to obtain a doctorate in psychopathology,” said Ashely. “I’m looking forward to a career in forensic profiling, abnormal psychology, and research.”