SOUTH DAKOTA HISTORICAL SOCIETY TO HOST AUTHOR SIGNING PARTY AT ARROWHEAD COUNTRY CLUB IN RAPID CITY

 

PIERRE, S.D. – It’s a party in Rapid City with authors, refreshments and the opportunity to meet people interested in South Dakota’s history.

The social and author signing party will take place from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. MDT on Thursday, April 26, at Arrowhead Country Club, 3675 Sheridan Lake Road. The event is sponsored by Arrowhead Country Club and is a fundraiser for the South Dakota Historical Society Foundation, the nonprofit fundraising partner of the South Dakota State Historical Society at the Cultural Heritage Center in Pierre.

Virginia Driving Hawk Sneve of Rapid City, author of “Sioux Women: Traditionally Sacred,” and Michael Casler of Williston, N.D., an editor of “Fort Tecumseh and Fort Pierre Chouteau: Journal and Letter Books 1830-1850” will be present to sign copies of their books.

Sneve was born and raised on the Rosebud Reservation. Many of her more than 20 book focus on American Indians. Sneve is the first South Dakotan to receive the National Humanities Medal. She drew on winter counts and oral records of her ancestors to discover their past for “Sioux Woman: Traditionally Sacred.” The book explores the struggles and joys of women in Lakota culture.

Casler is a former park ranger with the National Park Service who has written numerous articles on the Upper Missouri fur trade. Fort Tecumseh and Fort Pierre Chouteau were important fur trading posts located near what came  to be the city of Fort Pierre. Letter books consisted of copies of outgoing letters written by the managers of the posts to their company officers and subordinates in the field. Company employees recorded daily activities in journals. “Fort Tecumseh and Fort Pierre Chouteau” reveals day-to-day details of the business transacted at the fur trading posts and a glimpse into the lives of the men who staffed them.

Both books were published by the South Dakota Historical Society Press.

In addition to meeting the authors, those attending will be able to meet staff and members of the foundation’s board of directors and trustees of the South Dakota State Historical Society. Hors d’oeuvres and beverages will be provided.

The cost for the social is $50 per person, payable at the door. People may register by calling 605-773-6003 or going online at www.sdhsf.org/historyconference.html.

The Thursday social precedes the annual South Dakota State Historical Society History Conference, taking place April 27-28 at the Best Western Ramkota in Rapid City. For more information about the conference, visit www.history.sd.gov or call 605-773-6000.

Andrea Lekberg “The Artist Baker” Special Exhibition

“Red in Nature” Acrylic, paint, and mixed media on canvas © 2018 Andrea Lekberg

 

 

RAPID CITY, SOUTH DAKOTA: The Sioux Indian Museum, administered by the U.S. Department of the Interior, Indian Arts and Crafts Board, will feature an exhibit of artwork by Andrea Lekberg. The exhibition will run from April 27 through July 9, 2018. The exhibition is free and open to the public.

Andrea Lekberg, an enrolled member of the Oglala Sioux Tribe, is both a visual and culinary artist. She is currently working with large scale textiles, which are painted and adorned with various found materials. Additionally, she is the owner and pastry chef at a boutique bakery and café, The Artist Baker in Morristown, New Jersey. She holds a BFA from the Art Institute of Chicago and is a graduate of the Pastry Program at the Cooking and Hospitality Institute of Chicago.

Although raised in Illinois, Andrea spent her childhood summers near her family home in Martin, South Dakota. Inspiration for her current work comes from the landscapes around Martin, South Dakota. During her summer visits to the Pine Ridge Reservation she felt a deep connection to the land and people. The patterns, colors, and lines found in traditional Sioux artwork deeply influences her contemporary work.

To create the artwork for this exhibition, Andrea used hemmed canvases that were left unstretched so that they would lay flat; they resemble painted hides. A clear gesso is applied to the fabric and then acrylic paints complete the composition. Found natural materials collected near the family home in Martin, South Dakota, are eventually applied to the canvases.

The body of work in this exhibition revolves around Oglala artistic traditions and the local environment. Linen canvases are tied to represent spiritual strength and fringed to imply movement. They also represent Andrea’s cultural identity as a member of the Oglala Sioux, and the relevance of the Tribe in contemporary society.

Prices for the artwork can be obtained by contacting The Journey Museum Store at (605) 394-2201. To purchase artwork after the exhibit closes, please contact Andrea Lekberg via email at theartistbaker@gmail.com

The Sioux Indian Museum, managed by the U.S. Department of the Interior, Indian Arts and Crafts Board, is located in The Journey Museum, 222 New York Street, Rapid City, SD 57701. For admission fees and hours of operation please call (605) 394-6923.

EXPECT DELAYS HEADING TO RAPID CITY STARTING APRIL 9th AT CATRON BOULEVARD AND HIGHWAY 16

RAPID CITY, S.D. – The South Dakota Department of Transportation says work is scheduled to begin Monday, April 9, at the intersection of Highway 16 and Catron Boulevard in Rapid City.

Work being done includes median modifications, lighting, signals and pavement markings to add a second left turn lane for westbound traffic on Catron Boulevard turning left towards Mount Rushmore.

Motorists will see crews working in the median on the north side of the intersection installing a footing and electrical conduit for a new signal pole that will be installed later in the month.

Driving lanes will be reduced to one in each direction on Catron Boulevard in conjunction with the traffic control set up for the city resurfacing project on Catron Boulevard heading west from Highway 16.

Muth Electric, Inc., of Rapid City is the prime contractor on this $280,000 contract.  The overall completion date for the project is May 18, 2018.

For complete road construction information, visit www.safetravelusa.com/sd or dial 511.

I-90/Haines Ave. and Maple St. Bridge Rehabilitation

RAPID CITY, S.D. – The South Dakota Department of Transportation says rehabilitation work on the Haines Avenue and Maple Street bridges on Interstate 90 in Rapid City is set to begin Monday, April 16, and will impact traffic during much of 2018.

Construction is scheduled to begin Monday, April 16, 2018, in the eastbound lanes of I-90 with construction on westbound I-90 set to begin Aug. 13.

During Phase 1, the eastbound lanes of I-90 will be reduced to one lane through the work zone and both the I-190 northbound to I-90 eastbound on-ramp and the Exit 58 (Haines Avenue) eastbound on-ramp will be closed. Detours will be in place for all ramp closures.

Work is scheduled to be completed in the eastbound lanes of I-90 by late July, before the start of the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally.

Work on the bridges in the westbound lanes of I-90 is scheduled to be completed between Aug. 13 and Nov. 16. During this phase, westbound I-90 will be reduced to one lane through the construction zone and the Exit 59 (Lacrosse St.) westbound on-ramp will be closed with a signed detour.

Rehabilitation work involves removing and replacing the bridge approach slabs and approach pavement, repairing unsound concrete on the bridge decks, placing a high friction surface treatment on the Haines Avenue bridge and a new concrete overlay on the Maple Street bridge, along with barrier curb modifications.

Heavy Constructors, Inc. of Rapid City is the prime contractor on this $2.3 million project.

Information with construction limit and detour maps is available on the SDDOT website at: http://www.sddot.com/travelers/projects/I90HainesMaple/default.aspx.

For statewide construction information, visit www.safetravelusa.com/sd or call 511.

The Sioux Indian Museum To Feature Artist Jim LaPointe In Special Exhibit

 

RAPID CITY, SOUTH DAKOTA – The Sioux Indian Museum, administered by the U.S. Department of the Interior, Indian Arts and Crafts Board, will feature an exhibit of artwork by Jimi La Pointe.  The exhibition will run from January 19 through April 13, 2018.  The exhibition is free and open to the public.

Mr. La Pointe is a freelance illustrator and comic artist.  He holds a Bachelor of Fine Arts in New Media Arts from The Institute of American Indian Arts, Santa Fe, New Mexico.  An enrolled member of the Oglala Sioux Tribe, he currently resides in Wolf Creek, South Dakota.

La Pointe’s illustrations are simple with a stylized nature meant to capture a broader idea.  He explores art through the media of coffee stained watercolor paper, watercolors, inks, and colored pencils, executed in a style befitting a contemporary graphic novel.  To create his unique works, the watercolor paper is washed with day old coffee, and thick grain sea salt is applied to give a splattered effect.  Then, the images are sketched onto the paper.  Various colors of India ink and watercolor paint are then used to colorize the image.

La Pointe’s artistic approach is well-suited to children’s book illustrations, vinyl stickers, or small prints, a professional merchandising move he looks forward to making alongside a transition to digital media.  He hopes this would ensure the traditional cultural aspect of Lakota storytelling is brought into new mediums.  Mr. La Pointe received the Aplan Award at the 2015 Red Cloud Indian Art Show as well as the Diederich Landscape Award at the 2017 Red Cloud Indian Art Show.  This exhibition will mark the first solo show of his work in a museum setting.

Prices for the artwork can be obtained by contacting The Journey Museum Store at (605) 394-2201.  To purchase artwork after the exhibit closes, please contact Jimi La Pointe via email at jimilapointe@gmail.com

The Sioux Indian Museum, managed by the U.S. Department of the Interior, Indian Arts and Crafts Board, is located in The Journey Museum, 222 New York Street, Rapid City, SD 57701.  For admission fees and hours of operation please call (605) 394-6923.

Personalities of Old Rochford – First Event in Spring Turtle Soup Lecture Series

 

RAPID CITY, SD – The Journey Museum and Learning Center announces the first event in its Spring Turtle Soup Lecture series, “Personalities of Old Rochford”.  Beginning at noon on Friday, January 12, author Linda Sandness will tell the stories of Rochford’s first residents. From miners and loggers, to hunters and tourists, find out why Rochford, SD is proclaimed the “Friendliest Ghost Town in the Hills”.

“Personalities of Old Rochford” Turtle Soup will be held in the newly renovated Joe Rovere|Minnilusa Pioneer Room, located on the second floor of the museum. Located in the heart of the Black Hills, Rochford, SD was founded in 1878. A true boom town, by 1900 Rochford was home to less than 50 residents. Today, the remnants of Rochford are a popular tourist attraction, and the town is home to 9 full-time residents.

Linda Sandness first came to the Rochford area as a backpacker in the early 70s. Her heart never left. After retiring from a couple decades of teaching at SDSU, and serving as the visitor services coordinator for the SD State Parks, she spends most of her days enjoying cabin life in the suburbs of Rochford. She is the co-author of Rochford News Dakota Territory 1878-1881Rochford The Friendliest Ghost Town in the Black Hills, and Rochford Cooks.

Feed your mind and your belly with the Turtle Soup Lecture Series. Every Turtle Soup features a presentation on historic figures who influenced Black Hills history and includes soup from Angel’s Catering.

Admission for Turtle Soups are included in the regular cost of admission to the Journey Museum & Learning Center.

For more information and details about this event or other items, be sure to call (605) 394-6923 or emailvisserv@journeymuseum.org.

The Journey Museum and Learning Center was established in 1997 and is conveniently located in downtown

Rapid City at 222 New York St, 2 blocks east of the Rushmore Plaza Civic Center right across from the Club for Boys. Visit www.journeymuseum.org to find additional schedule information and ‘like’ us on Facebook!

Gov. Daugaard To Appoint Michael Diedrich To District 34 House Seat

Michael Diedrich

December 29, 2017

PIERRE, S.D. – Gov. Dennis Daugaard announced today that he will appoint Michael Diedrich of Rapid City to fill the District 34 vacancy in the State House of Representatives.

Diedrich will succeed the late Craig Tieszen, who passed away in November. He will serve during the 2018 Legislative Session and his term will continue through the end of 2018.

Diedrich previously served in the South Dakota State Senate from 1987-91 and from 1993-95. He is vice president of governmental relations for Regional Health in Rapid City. During his almost seven years at Regional Health, Diedrich has also worked as associate general counsel and as interim VP of the compliance, human resources, and development departments. Diedrich previously spent 11 years in the Rapid City city attorney’s office, including seven years as city attorney, and also worked in private business.

“Mike Diedrich has extensive experience in the legislature, in private industry, and in the municipal and non-profit sectors,” said Gov. Daugaard. “With Rep. Tieszen’s sad passing, I appreciate that Mike is willing to step in and serve in the State House.”

Diedrich is a graduate of Rapid City Central High School, and earned his bachelor’s and law degrees from the University of South Dakota. He also holds a master’s degree in public administration from the Harvard University Kennedy School of Government, and a master of laws in healthcare law from Loyola University School of Law.

“Craig Tiezen was dedicated to making a meaningful difference in the lives of others. I plan to serve with the same level of integrity, strong values and compassion that he displayed in all facets of life,” Diedrich said. “As a lifelong resident of Rapid City, I am humbled to represent my neighbors and community to positively impact change now and for future generations.”

Diedrich has served on many community and states board. He currently serves on the Rapid City Rushmore Plaza Civic Center board of directors, the Mt. Rushmore Society board of directors, the Rapid City Chamber of Commerce public policy and government affairs committees, the South Dakota Health Care Solutions Coalition, and the Boy Scouts of America district board. Diedrich is also a member of the board of directors of Black Hills Community Bank, N.A.

Diedrich and his wife, Connie, have two sons, Chris and Ross.

District 34 includes western Rapid City, generally including the areas west of Mt. Rushmore Road, Dinosaur Hill, and “the gap” on West Main Street, and including sites such as Camp Rapid, Canyon Lake, the Sioux San Hospital, West Middle School, and Southwest Middle School.

 

Gov. Daugaard Invites Nominations For District 34 House Seat

December 6, 2017

PIERRE, S.D. – Gov. Dennis Daugaard is asking the public to nominate candidates to fill the vacant seat in the State House of Representatives from District 34.

The vacancy, which will be filled by gubernatorial appointment, is due to the death last month of Rep. Craig Tieszen. The Governor’s appointee will serve during the 2018 Legislative Session, and through the current term that runs through the end of 2018.

“Rep. Tieszen was a dedicated public servant and his passing is a real loss for our state,” said Gov. Daugaard. “I’m asking the public to help identify an appointee to complete Rep. Tieszen’s term.”

District 34 includes western Rapid City, generally including the areas west of Mt. Rushmore Road, Dinosaur Hill, and “the gap” on West Main Street, and including sites such as Camp Rapid, Canyon Lake, the Sioux San Hospital, West Middle School, and Southwest Middle School. A district map can be found at SD Legislature

Those wishing to be considered for the appointment, or to offer nominations, should contact Grace Beck in the Office of the Governor at 605-773-3661. Nominations should include the candidate’s name, current address, telephone number and relevant background information.

Silver Mountain Prescribed Fire Project to Continue West of Rapid City, SD

 

November 29, 2017

Rapid City, South Dakota – The Mystic Ranger District on the Black Hills National Forest is planning to continue ignition on the Silver Mountain project Thursday, Nov. 30 and Friday, Dec. 1, depending on weather.

One hundred and 8 acres were successfully ignited Oct. 31, 2017. Fire managers plan to burn an additional 389 acres Thursday through Friday.

The project area is located near Rockerville, South Dakota, west of Boulder Hill and east of Beretta Road. Ignition will begin late morning and last throughout the day. A night shift will patrol following ignitions. Due to the high volume of traffic on Beretta Road, it will be temporarily closed on Thursday and Friday for public safety and safety of the firefighters.

Smoke will be visible for several miles and could impact Highway 16, Hill City, Rapid City and other surrounding areas.

For every prescribed burn, specialists write burn plans. Burn plans identify, or prescribe, the best conditions under which trees and other plants will burn to get the best results safely. Burn plans consider temperature, humidity, wind, moisture of the vegetation, and conditions for the dispersal of smoke.

Implementation is also supported by a National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) document. Specialists such as: hydrologists, archaeologists, wildlife biologists, among others, are involved with this process that requires federal agencies to integrate environmental values into their decision making processes by considering the environmental impacts of their proposed actions and reasonable alternatives to those actions.

With all of the planning that goes into a prescribed fire project, managers will not ignite a project unless the conditions meet the criteria described in the burn plan. “We spend years planning,” said Wayne Yanders, Black Hills National Forest firefighter. “If we are out of prescription, we will cancel the burn and wait for a better day.”

The right fire, at the right place, at the right time can reduce hazardous fuels, protect communities from extreme fires; minimize the spread of pest insects; remove unwanted species that threaten species native to an ecosystem; provide forage for game; improve habitat for species; recycle nutrients back to the soil; and promote the growth of trees, wildflowers and other plants.

As conditions permit, fire officials will continue to assess ignition of other prescribed burn units across the Black Hills National Forest.